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Nisha Sethi
Clinical Psychologist

Nisha Sethi BPsych(Hons), MPsychol(Clin), PhD, MACPA, MAACBT, MACBS
Registration Number: PSY0001256664
Medicare Provider Number: 4258655B

Nisha is a dedicated Clinical Psychologist who uses evidence-based assessment and treatment approaches to provide her clients with the highest standard of care. She works with older adolescents and adults experiencing anxiety, depression, perfectionism, grief and psychosis. She also provides treatments for adults with weight management issues, drug and alcohol problems, eating difficulties and relationship difficulties. She is particularly skilled at developing strong therapeutic relationships with her clients and adapts her approach to suit her client\'s needs. This flexibility has allowed her to work with individuals with diverse age and cultural backgrounds. Her main therapeutic approaches are Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT), Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) and Mindfulness.

Nisha completed her PhD and Masters of Psychology degrees at the University of New South Wales, and trained in the Acute Psychiatric Hospital, Kiloh Centre, at Prince of Wales Hospital, and in the Health Psychology Unit at Concord Repatriation General Hospital. Like all clinicians at CPC, Nisha is strongly committed to remain up-to-date with the latest research to inform her work with her clients. She has contributed to peer-review journal publications and presented her research at national and international conferences. She has worked in private practice over the last seven years.

Publications

Zadro, L., Godwin, A., Svetieva, E., Sethi, N., Iannuzzelli, R., & Gonsalkorale, K. (2017). Creating the silence: Ostracism from the perspective of the source. K.D. Williams & S. A. Nida (Eds.) Ostracism, Exclusion, and Rejection. New York: Routledge,

Sethi, N., Moulds, M.L. & Richardson, R. (2013). The Role of Focus of Attention and Reappraisal in Prolonging the Negative Effects of Ostracism. Group Dynamics, Theory, Research, and Practice, 17, 110-123.

Perry, Y, Henry, J. D., Sethi, N., & Grisham, J. R. (2011). The pain persists: How social exclusion affects individuals with schizophrenia. British Journal of Clinical Psychology, doi: 10.1348/014466510X523490


Presentations

Sethi, N., Moulds, M. L., & Richardson, R. (2010). Ostracism hurts, but why for so long? The role of focus of attention and reappraisal in prolonging the negative effects of ostracism. 6th Convention for the World Congress for Behavioural and Cognitive Therapies,

Perry, Y., Henry, J.D., Sethi, N. & Grisham, J.R. (June). (2010). Is social exclusion still painful if you're used to it? Exploring the impact of ostracism in individuals with schizophrenia. 6th Convention for the World Congress for Behavioural and Cognitive Therapies, Boston,

Sethi, N., Moulds, M. L., & Richardson, R. (June). (2010). Why does the hurt last? Retrieving negative autobiographical memories prolongs the negative effects of ostracism. 6th Convention for the World Congress for Behavioural and Cognitive Therapies, Boston,

Sethi, N., Moulds, M. L., & Richardson, R. (2010). Why does the hurt last? Retrieving negative autobiographical memories prolongs the negative effects of ostracism. 22nd Annual Convention for the Association for Psychological Science, Boston,